Showing posts with label wool. Show all posts
Showing posts with label wool. Show all posts

Sunday, 4 May 2014

FINISHED KNIT No. 2 + Giveaway WINNERS!!

Julia Bobbin - A 1938 Vintage Sweater - It Cannot Fail to Please; Susan Crawford 

I might be now 100 years old, but I've finally finished my second knitted garment.

Let me introduce to you the 'It cannot fail to please' sweater/jumper by Susan Crawford. It's a reproduction of a stunning original knit pattern from 1938.

Julia Bobbin - A 1938 Vintage Sweater - It Cannot Fail to Please; Susan Crawford

I'll always be a sewing girl at heart, but goodness gracious I am loving this knitting thing! There is something truly harmonious about wearing something where you have actually made the fabric, and it has taken you more than 80 hours!

Julia Bobbin - A 1938 Vintage Sweater - It Cannot Fail to Please; Susan Crawford

It's not something that you just chuck on over your head when you want to wear it, you almost need a freaking ceremony. Or at least someone to throw rose petals at you while you get dressed.
My poor husband.

Pattern Details
It cannot fail to please by Susan Crawford.
Originally from 1938.
This bad boy is sewn with with U.S. size 1 and 3 needles so it takes a loooooooong time, but small stitches just look so neat and pretty don't you think?

Julia Bobbin - A 1938 Vintage Sweater - It Cannot Fail to Please; Susan Crawford

Yarn
4 ply Rowan wool in Raspberry (8 skeins).

Size and Fit
I made this in the medium size and dang it, it's a little bit too big! Not noticeably, but enough to annoy me. Since knitting my first ever cardigan the Miette, I've come to realise that I'm a loose knitter. That and I really need to swatch better.

I used slightly more yarn than the pattern said I would need and after I wet blocked I realised that the sweater is just a bit too big. The shoulders are too long, and it's a little bit boxier than I would have liked around the midriff. This pattern would look better on a smaller bust (not much I can do there) but overall I still think it looks pretty great!

Julia Bobbin - A 1938 Vintage Sweater - It Cannot Fail to Please; Susan Crawford

Changes
The only change I made was to make the sleeves in a small size as I have pretty thin arms and the sleeves are quite full.

Julia Bobbin - A 1938 Vintage Sweater - It Cannot Fail to Please; Susan Crawford

Wet-blocking
This was my first time wet-blocking and I can now completely understand why people were harping on about it's merits! It completely relaxes the seams, sets the stitches and makes your knitting look so much better! Check out this before and after:

Julia Bobbin - A 1938 Vintage Sweater - It Cannot Fail to Please; Susan Crawford
You can see this pic and more on my Instagram

See how much flatter and even the pattern is? Genius!

Ravelry
If you are on Ravelry, you can check out more details about my sweater here.

Love
I am in love with the beautiful leaf pattern of this garment. I finished making this top a few months ago and at the time I was so glad to be done with it. Now I miss knitting the repetitive leaf pattern. It's just so pretty and classic looking don't you think? I'm also a lover of all things vintage so I was naturally drawn to this pattern from 1938.

Julia Bobbin - A 1938 Vintage Sweater - It Cannot Fail to Please; Susan Crawford

I love the the puffy sleeves and the square shape of the neckline. Looks so pretty with a brooch or a flower!

Julia Bobbin - A 1938 Vintage Sweater - It Cannot Fail to Please; Susan Crawford
Julia Bobbin - A 1938 Vintage Sweater - It Cannot Fail to Please; Susan Crawford
Julia Bobbin - A 1938 Vintage Sweater - It Cannot Fail to Please; Susan Crawford

Styling
I teamed the sweater with my black pencil skirt, a gold brooch and raspberry heels. Oh and red lipstick too of course!

Julia Bobbin - A 1938 Vintage Sweater - It Cannot Fail to Please; Susan Crawford

Even though the fit isn't 100% I'm really proud of how it turned out and I'm in love with the style! Susan Crawford has quite a few patterns from this era and I already have about ten that I want to make! Though it's from a different era, I feel like it's the type of sweater that Joan from Mad Men would appreciate, don't you think?

Julia Bobbin - A 1938 Vintage Sweater - It Cannot Fail to Please; Susan Crawford

GIVEAWAY WINNERS:

Thanks to everyone who commented on my Billie Jean Dress post. These three lucky winners were randomly selected and have each won a fabulous vintage brooch curtesy of Ruemiraldi!

SewDiane from Sew Far Sew Good
Nat from Sew Outnumbered
Debra from The Vintage Counterfeiter

Congratulations ladies! I'll be in touch with you shortly via email to organise delivery.

Here's a little cuteness for you on your weekend; a dress I made for a dear friend's beautiful 4year old daughter. A self drafted, fully lined dress with a tule underskirt for a perfect little Snow White. Is she not the loveliest thing you've ever seen?

Julia Bobbin, snow white

Happy sewing everyone, and May the Fourth be with you :)

Sunday, 2 December 2012

Tutorial: Bound Button-Holes and Facings

Hello friends!

Remember this snazzy new winter coat I made for my sister Angeline? (click on the pictures below to see the blog post). I decided to try bound-button holes for the first time and I was so happy with the result!

Julia Bobbin, Tutorial: Bound Button Holes and FacingsJulia Bobbin, Tutorial: Bound Button Holes and Facings

These days it's almost impossible to find a purchased garment with bound button-holes.

this photo curtesy of www.janome.com

Don't get me wrong, machine button holes are an amazing invention. They are super fast, sturdy and easy to make. I use machine button-holes all the time.

But would you take a look at this button-hole!

julia bobbin, bound buttonhole, tutorial

Isn't it pretty?!! So if you feel in the mood to go the extra mile for your garment, here's a tutorial to get you started.

So here's what you need
  • Sewers chalk/fabric marker
  • A ruler
  • Pins
  • Scraps of your fabric
  • Interfacing scraps
  • Thread matching your fabric
  • Scissors
  • Button-hole cutter (if you have one, otherwise small clippers will do).
  • Hand sewing needle
  • Your sewing machine
  • Iron
  • Patience
  • Chocolates - for snacking, not for sewing. Delicious.
There are plenty of different bound button-hole methods out there and they are all good. This is how I made mine.

Instructions

Each bound button-hole has two identical 'lips' that fill the square of the buttonhole. Each lip is made up of one strip of fabric.

On the right side of your fabric, carefully mark your button-holes.

Julia Bobbin, Tutorial: Bound Button Holes and Facings

Interface the back area of the button-hole for extra strength. Most paper patterns will direct you to interface that area whether you are making bound button-holes or regular machine button-holes.

The fabric I am using in my demonstration is a Merino wool suiting. Ooooohhhh fancy.

Julia Bobbin, Tutorial: Bound Button Holes and Facings

Making the Button-hole Lips

Width: The long side. Measure the width of your button-holes. The width of mine are 1 inch.
Write your measurement down. Add one inch to that measurement. That is going to the be the width of your button-hole strips that will become button-hole lips.

E.g. My button-holes are 1 inch in width. I add 1 inch on to that width. (1 + 1 = 2) The total width of my button-hole strips is going to be 2 inches.


Height: The short side. What height do you want those cute little lips to be? This is a personal choice. I made mine a tidy 1/4 inch.
Once you've decided, multiply that measurement by 4 to get your total height of your button-hole strips.

E.g. I made my height1/4 inch. Therefore 1/4 x 4 = 1 inch.

Now that we have our width and height, cut out two strips of your garment fabric with those measures (mine is 2 inches long, 1 inch wide). These two strips will become the lips of our button-hole.

Construction

With the wrong sides of your fabric strip together,  press your strips in half along the width (long side).

Julia Bobbin, Tutorial: Bound Button Holes and Facings

On the right side of your garment, line up one of your pressed strips along the edge of your button-hole marking with the raw edges of your button-hole lip along the button-hole marking.
Pin that bad boy down.

Note: Make sure it's the raw edges that touch the centre line. It will take years off your life if you do it the other way around.

Julia Bobbin, Tutorial: Bound Button Holes and Facings

With your fabric marker/chalk, transfer the end of the button-hole markings onto the strips so you can see where you need to start and stop sewing.

Julia Bobbin, Tutorial: Bound Button Holes and Facings

Line up the second button-hole strip and pin it down. The raw edges of each lip should now be touching in the centre.
Continue the markings on this strip also.

Tip: Don't be afraid to go nuts with extra pins, or basting the lips down, especially when working with thicker fabric. You want them to be as straight as possible.

Julia Bobbin, Tutorial: Bound Button Holes and Facings

With a 1.5 length stitch or smaller, slowly sew down the centre of each strip, reversing at the start and end. You want these lengths to be exactly the same as each other or you'll end up with crooked button-holes.

Julia Bobbin, Tutorial: Bound Button Holes and Facings

Below is a view from the back, on the wrong side of the garment. It's easier to see if the lengths are the same by looking at it from the back. 
If they look a little uneven, go back and sew the shorter one a few extra stitches to make it the same.

Tip: If it helps, count each stitch as you sew it down so you can mirror that on the other side.

Julia Bobbin, Tutorial: Bound Button Holes and Facings

With your button-hole cutter (or clippers if you don't have one) cut a small hole through the centre of your button-hole. Make sure you put something underneath your garment so that you don't stab your table!

Julia Bobbin, Tutorial: Bound Button Holes and Facings

Here's a view from the back.

Julia Bobbin, Tutorial: Bound Button Holes and Facings

From that initial cut, with your clippers, cut into the corners of your button-holes making a 'Y' shape at both ends. Make sure you keep the lips out of the way or you'll slice a hole through your hard work. This is soul destroying.

Julia Bobbin, Tutorial: Bound Button Holes and Facings

On the right side, push the button-hole lips through the cut so that all the raw edges are on the wrong side of the button-hole.
Squeal with delight when you see how your button-hole is starting to look like a button-hole! Good job!

Julia Bobbin, Tutorial: Bound Button Holes and Facings

If you flip one side of the fabric over you'll see the two ends of your button-hole lips poking out at the short side of your button-hole. You should also see the little V shape jutting out. That's from when we made the Y shape cut. This little V stands for 'very important'. We are going to sew this V down.

Julia Bobbin, Tutorial: Bound Button Holes and Facings

Carefully sew the V strip down onto the end of the two lips with only one line of stitches. You want to sew as close to the base of the V without sewing into the fold of fabric, otherwise you'll end up with puckers in your garment.

Julia Bobbin, Tutorial: Bound Button Holes and Facings

Julia Bobbin, Tutorial: Bound Button Holes and Facings

Flip the fabric back over to check that it is straight and that there are no puckers. Looks good huh??!!! If not, unpick it and start again. One little row of stitches is easy to unpick.


Julia Bobbin, Tutorial: Bound Button Holes and Facings

Once you're happy that it's straight and neat, flip it back over and go over your initial sewing line a few times to really secure it. Trim away the threads. Repeat these steps on the other side of your button-hole.

Julia Bobbin, Tutorial: Bound Button Holes and Facings

Here's what it looks like from the back once you've sewn both sides down. This will be covered up when you add the facing.

Julia Bobbin, Tutorial: Bound Button Holes and Facings

Turn your fabric back over to the right side ... Tad-Dah! A neat little button-hole! You will be amazed how good it makes you feel when you make your first neat bound button-hole.

Julia Bobbin, Tutorial: Bound Button Holes and Facings

Now for the button-hole facings

Carefully line up your garment and facings wrong sides together. Pin them together so they don't move. We put them wrong sides together so that you can actually see your button-hole. Don't worry, you're not going to be sewing them wrong sides together.

Julia Bobbin, Tutorial: Bound Button Holes and Facings

Put a pin through the corner of each button-hole so that it goes through to the facing.

Julia Bobbin, Tutorial: Bound Button Holes and Facings

Flip the garment over to the facing and mark the button-hole onto the right side of the facing using the pins as a guide.

Julia Bobbin, Tutorial: Bound Button Holes and FacingsJulia Bobbin, Tutorial: Bound Button Holes and Facings

Remove the pins and seperate the garment from the facings. Set the garment aside.

Cut out a good size square of fusible interfacing. Don't worry too much about how big it is as it will be hidden inside the garment.

Julia Bobbin, Tutorial: Bound Button Holes and Facings

Transfer the facing button-hole markings onto the wrong side of your fusible interfacing (the sticky side).

Pin the interfacing to the facing, right sides together.

Julia Bobbin, Tutorial: Bound Button Holes and Facings

Using your short stitch, slowly sew down that button-hole rectangle going along the markings. You want to slow slightly inside your original markings so that the button-hole on your facing is ever-so-slightly smaller than the original button hole.

Tip: Start sewing in the middle of of one of your markings not at the corner of the button-hole. This makes it easier to reverse over to finish your stitch, without making the stitch too bulky at the corners.

Julia Bobbin, Tutorial: Bound Button Holes and Facings

Cut a hole through the centre of your button-hole using your button-hole cutter or clippers. Cut into the corners with a Y shape like on your original button-hole.

Julia Bobbin, Tutorial: Bound Button Holes and Facings

Push the interfacing through the hole to the wrong side of the fabric. gently fuse the interfacing to the wrong side of the facing with an iron.

Julia Bobbin, Tutorial: Bound Button Holes and Facings

You now have a perfectly shaped and positioned button-hole opening.

Julia Bobbin, Tutorial: Bound Button Holes and Facings

When you have finished your garment, slip-stitch your button-hole facing to your bound-buton hole.

And there you have it folks! Thinking of giving bound bound-button holes a try? It is so exciting when you make them for the first time.

Julia Bobbin, Tutorial: Bound Button Holes and Facings

If you are ecstatically showing your new completed bound button-holes to family or friends who are not giving you the manically excited reaction you are expecting ... then feel free to email me a picture of your finished bound button-holes at julia@juliabobbin.com I guarantee I'll be excited to see them!

Happy sewing lovelies xxx

Sunday, 18 November 2012

Fruity Tessuti - Butterick 5145

Julia Bobbin, Butterick 5145, hot pink coat, Jess from New Girl coat

Ever laughed so hard your face actually looks like you're in pain and people start instinctively backing away from you like you're a crazy person? Well that's what I look like when I watch the TV show 'New Girl'. Things get a bit messy.

I saw my first episode of this show while flying back to Melbourne from Washington DC and my poor husband was ready to smother me with my pillow if I didn't stop laughing out loud. Bless.

Julia Bobbin, Butterick 5145, hot pink coat, Jess from New Girl coat
photo curtesy of www.zdw.com

In one scene the lovely Jess played by Zooey Deschanel wears this striking hot pink coat and both my sister and I instantly fell in love with it, so I decided to make a similar version.

I used Butterick Pattern 5145 in a size eight for my gorgeous sister Angeline. It was nice sewing something so small!

I used a stunning wool/cashmere coating from Tessuti Fabrics for the shell of the coat which I purchased from the Melbourne store.

Julia Bobbin, Butterick 5145, hot pink coat, Jess from New Girl coat

I actually made this pattern over a year ago for myself in a gorgeous green (also from Tessuti) but it was before I started this blog so I've never posted about it before. Here are a few pics of the green coat:

Julia Bobbin, Butterick 5145, hot pink coat, Jess from New Girl coatJulia Bobbin, Butterick 5145, hot pink coat, Jess from New Girl coat

I'm having serious face-fail in this photo. Dear. Lord.

For the lining of this coat I used an awesome print that I found on spoon flower. It's called 'Fruit and veggie madness fabric' by heidikenney I love her quirky designs, and they are perfect for the lining of a coat! I had it printed on a silk/cotton blend.

Julia Bobbin, Butterick 5145, hot pink coat, Jess from New Girl coat Julia Bobbin, Butterick 5145, hot pink coat, Jess from New Girl coat

For those of you that are not familiar with Spoon Flower, it's an awesome website where you can upload your own fabric designs and have them printed on a number of different fabric types. You can also purchase other peoples designs, which is what I've done here. It's such an awesome idea!

So let's talk construction:

The Jacket

I made view C with the length of View B in a straight size 8.
Julia Bobbin, Butterick 5145, hot pink coat, Jess from New Girl coat
Julia Bobbin, Butterick 5145, hot pink coat, Jess from New Girl coatJulia Bobbin, Butterick 5145, hot pink coat, Jess from New Girl coat

It closes with three button holes, has a peter pan collar, and a lovely box pleat in the back skirt of the coat.

The Lining

The coat is fully lined, so it looks pretty on the inside and out.

Julia Bobbin, Butterick 5145, hot pink coat, Jess from New Girl coatJulia Bobbin, Butterick 5145, hot pink coat, Jess from New Girl coat

I didn't have quite enough of the lining fabric for all the pieces, so I made the biggest part of the sleeve linings out of a yellow satin silk with the cuffs of the sleeve lining in the proper fabric. That way if the sleeves are rolled up you can still see the proper lining.

Julia Bobbin, Butterick 5145, hot pink coat, Jess from New Girl coatJulia Bobbin, Butterick 5145, hot pink coat, Jess from New Girl coat

Favourite Bits

My favourite features of this coat is the cute little peter-pan collar ...

Julia Bobbin, Butterick 5145, hot pink coat, Jess from New Girl coat

... the back pleat ...

Julia Bobbin, Butterick 5145, hot pink coat, Jess from New Girl coatJulia Bobbin, Butterick 5145, hot pink coat, Jess from New Girl coat

... and the sneaky little side pockets.

Julia Bobbin, Butterick 5145, hot pink coat, Jess from New Girl coatJulia Bobbin, Butterick 5145, hot pink coat, Jess from New Girl coat

And just to be a bit of sewing nerd, look how the fruit on the lining matches up on the inside pleat!

Julia Bobbin, Butterick 5145, hot pink coat, Jess from New Girl coat    Julia Bobbin, Butterick 5145, hot pink coat, Jess from New Girl coat

But before you start calling me a genius, I must admit that this was actually a complete FLUKE. A glorious, serendipitous accident.

Changes I made

Bound Button Holes 
Instead of doing the regular machine buttons holes, I thought I'd challenge myself and try bound-button holes. I absolutely love the effect! It is a lot more time consuming, mainly because you have to make sure that you make everything absolutely the same so that you don't end up with uneven button holes, and also because it's my first time so I'm slow.

Julia Bobbin, Butterick 5145, hot pink coat, Jess from New Girl coat

Julia Bobbin, Butterick 5145, hot pink coat, Jess from New Girl coatJulia Bobbin, Butterick 5145, hot pink coat, Jess from New Girl coat

Yes they take a lot longer but they are well worth the effort. They are neat, strong and I reckon they look so much nicer on a coat! Now-a-days you only would ever see these type of button holes on couture items in the stores. Infact, if you opened up your own closet you'd be hard pressed to find any purchased garment that didn't have a machine stitched button hole.

Here's a comparison picture of a bound button hole and a machine button hole.

 
Images curtesy of Threads Magazine and Wikipedia

I ordered my fabric covered buttons from Button Mania Yes I know I could do them my self, but this is so much easier for a time poor lass, and Kate from Button Mania is a perfectionist so you know you are going to get good quality.

Julia Bobbin, Butterick 5145, hot pink coat, Jess from New Girl coat

Pleated lining Hem
For extra movement in the lining I added a little pleat in the corner of the lining hem. This allows the lining to move up and down at the hem when you do. Stops potential tearing.

 Julia Bobbin, Butterick 5145, hot pink coat, Jess from New Girl coat

Conclusion

I love how this coat turned out and how well it fits my sister Angeline. It's definitely heating up in Australia, so my sister is going to have to wait a while before she can wear it.

 Julia Bobbin, Butterick 5145, hot pink coat, Jess from New Girl coatJulia Bobbin, Butterick 5145, hot pink coat, Jess from New Girl coat

Melbourne is known for being a sea of black clothes, so I like the fact that this pink coat will definitely stand out in a crown of muted colours.

Julia Bobbin, Butterick 5145, hot pink coat, Jess from New Girl coat